Michelle Young

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  • in reply to: Got questions?? #4238

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    Hmmm…yes–and no, Expecto. 🙂 Yes because you need to consider the other transiting planets. And no because you still need to consider what transiting bodies will make contact with your Sun during that entire period. Right there, that means the Moon will still be connecting with this point at least 4 times during the following month alone. It’s a no brainer, of course, if you have a New Moon, a Full Moon or a Sun-Moon square from birth, that you’ve established that bond. In fact, this may be the bond that keeps giving even in the worst case scenarios! 🙂 But then during eclipses where you’re having some amazing connections, it can be sweet music to your ears. If anything, this is why people who are paying attention to the eclipses should go beyond just the degrees on the eclipse point and take note of each and every planetary interaction with the natal chart for at least several months after. (And of course, it doesn’t hurt to see what’s going on with your Solar and Lunar Returns for some guidance too. 🙂 )

    in reply to: Got questions?? #4223

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    My sincere apologies for the delay, Expecto! I’m finally in the midst of developing the new Solar Returns for India and Pakistan. In the meantime, the energies of an eclipse generally aer in play as each body during the transiting eclipse will relate to your natal chart. For example, beyond the Sun and the Moon, if Venus is conjunct the Sun, you might notice very nice events taking place every time the Moon or any other transit for the next several months (even more if this is clearly associated with your Solar Return, which depends on the times involved for the Return and the eclipse) makes a contact to the transiting degree Venus took at the time of the eclipse. (I know: read it twice! lol) That’s true, regardless of whether we’re speaking about a Solar Eclipse or a Lunar Eclipse.

    As I write this, for example, today (in about 2.5 hours) the Lunar Eclipse will be taking place. While I’m not in the midst of a new return in my chart, there are several aspects being triggered by the Lunar Eclipse as it relates to my natal chart. I have no doubt I’ll feel this in a number of ways. I believe it will be pretty good, actually, since there are some soft aspects also in play.

    Does that help? 🙂 Again, my apologies for the delay. And yes, we could use more questions here but hopefully after I have these two returns uploaded. Each will be a biggie this time, which you’ll understand after seeing what I’m doing with this one for each nation.

    in reply to: Astronomy, Science and Technology #3619

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    August 5, 2016 Hubble’s Sky Full of Stars!
    Globular Cluster NGC 4833
    Located approximately 22,000 light-years away in the constellation of Musca (The Fly), this tightly packed collection of stars — known as a globular cluster — goes by the name of NGC 4833. This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows the dazzling stellar group in all its glory.

    NGC 4833 is one of the over 150 globular clusters known to reside within the Milky Way. These objects are thought to contain some of the oldest stars in our galaxy. Studying these ancient cosmic clusters can help astronomers to unravel how a galaxy formed and evolved, and give an idea of the galaxy’s age.

    Globular clusters are responsible for some of the most striking sights in the cosmos, with hundreds of thousands of stars congregating in the same region of space. Hubble has observed many of these clusters during its time in orbit around our planet, each as breathtaking as the last.

    Image credit: ESA/Hubble and NASA
    Text credit: European Space Agency

    Last Updated: Aug. 5, 2016
    Editor: Ashley Morrow

    And of course, what goes with this sky full of stars from NASA? Who else but…

    in reply to: Astronomy, Science and Technology #3417

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    Help the Higgs find its siblings!

    Interested in joining a citizen science project called HiggsHunters to help CERN locate Higgs boson’s relatives? HiggsHunters.org is looking for people who would like an opportunity to “uncover the building blocks of the universe” and “help search for unkonwn exotic particles in the LHC data!’ By making use of a citizen science platform called Zooniverse, you can help to look for ‘baby Higgs bosons’, which leave a characteristic trace in the ATLAS detector. More than 20000 amateur scientist from 179 nations have scoured images of LHC collisions for the past 2 years in search of still undiscovered particles.
    CERN - How the particles appear in the collider
    “There are tasks – even in this high-tech world – where the human eye and the human brain simply win out,” says Professor Alan Barr of the University of Oxford, who is leading the project.

    The HiggsHunters.org (link is external) project is a collaboration between the University of Oxford and the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom, and NYU in the United States. It makes use of the Zooniverse citizen science platform, which hosts over 40 projects from searches for new astrophysical objects in telescope surveys to following the habits of wildlife in the Serengeti. The HiggsHunters project shows collisions recorded by the ATLAS experiment and uses software and display tools developed by the ATLAS collaboration. The scientists gratefully acknowledge the generous financial support of the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council, the University of Oxford, and Merton College, Oxford.

    You can also get involved in other citizen science projects through LHC@home, a volunteer computing platform where you donate idle time on your computer to help physicists compare theory with experiment in the search for new fundamental particles and answers to questions about the Universe. ​

    See? I said there was more, and pretty exciting “more” at that, I think. Wouldn’t you agree? 😉

    in reply to: Astronomy, Science and Technology #3416

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    I just posted a new article in Astrology of the Unexpected Kind in the News, and immediately after, I remembered this thread! Mea culpa!

    You’ll find that article, “Large Hadron Collider finds three new particles, confirms fourth” over there. Again, with my apologies.

    If you go there before reading my next post (I have it set to open in the same tab), I hope you’ll remember to come back here because I have more news to share from CERN! They’ve been busy this week!

    in reply to: Tell me the way of learing Astrology and Tarot Card! #3134

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for the interim message, Expecto. I’m very grateful! :heart:

    in reply to: Tell me the way of learing Astrology and Tarot Card! #3133

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for your patience, brenjail! Joan Bunning’s free online Learning Tarot course can be found at Learn Tarot. She’s been doing this for years and knows her stuff.

    in reply to: Astronomy, Science and Technology #3070

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    Exciting news that should keep Mike Brown of the IAU quite busy for a while and finally away from the Pluto debate! (Thanks to our own Christine for this cosmic pearl!)

    NASA’s Kepler Mission Announces Largest Collection of Planets Ever Discovered
    Artist's concept of select planetary discoveries to date by NASA's Kepler space telescope. NASA - W Stenzel
    Artist’s concept of select planetary discoveries to date by NASA’s Kepler space telescope. NASA – W Stenzel

    NASA’s Kepler mission has verified 1,284 new planets – the single largest finding of planets to date.

    “This announcement more than doubles the number of confirmed planets from Kepler,” said Ellen Stofan, chief scientist at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “This gives us hope that somewhere out there, around a star much like ours, we can eventually discover another Earth.”

    Analysis was performed on the Kepler space telescope’s July 2015 planet candidate catalog, which identified 4,302 potential planets. For 1,284 of the candidates, the probability of being a planet is greater than 99 percent – the minimum required to earn the status of “planet.” An additional 1,327 candidates are more likely than not to be actual planets, but they do not meet the 99 percent threshold and will require additional study. The remaining 707 are more likely to be some other astrophysical phenomena. This analysis also validated 984 candidates previously verified by other techniques.

    “Before the Kepler space telescope launched, we did not know whether exoplanets were rare or common in the galaxy. Thanks to Kepler and the research community, we now know there could be more planets than stars,” said Paul Hertz, Astrophysics Division director at NASA Headquarters. “This knowledge informs the future missions that are needed to take us ever-closer to finding out whether we are alone in the universe.”

    Kepler captures the discrete signals of distant planets – decreases in brightness that occur when planets pass in front of, or transit, their stars – much like the May 9 Mercury transit of our sun. Since the discovery of the first planets outside our solar system more than two decades ago, researchers have resorted to a laborious, one-by-one process of verifying suspected planets.

    This latest announcement, however, is based on a statistical analysis method that can be applied to many planet candidates simultaneously. Timothy Morton, associate research scholar at Princeton University in New Jersey and lead author of the scientific paper published in The Astrophysical Journal, employed a technique to assign each Kepler candidate a planet-hood probability percentage – the first such automated computation on this scale, as previous statistical techniques focused only on sub-groups within the greater list of planet candidates identified by Kepler.

    “Planet candidates can be thought of like bread crumbs,” said Morton. “If you drop a few large crumbs on the floor, you can pick them up one by one. But, if you spill a whole bag of tiny crumbs, you’re going to need a broom. This statistical analysis is our broom.”

    In the newly-validated batch of planets, nearly 550 could be rocky planets like Earth, based on their size. Nine of these orbit in their sun’s habitable zone, which is the distance from a star where orbiting planets can have surface temperatures that allow liquid water to pool. With the addition of these nine, 21 exoplanets now are known to be members of this exclusive group.

    “They say not to count our chickens before they’re hatched, but that’s exactly what these results allow us to do based on probabilities that each egg (candidate) will hatch into a chick (bona fide planet),” said Natalie Batalha, co-author of the paper and the Kepler mission scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California. “This work will help Kepler reach its full potential by yielding a deeper understanding of the number of stars that harbor potentially habitable, Earth-size planets — a number that’s needed to design future missions to search for habitable environments and living worlds.”

    Of the nearly 5,000 total planet candidates found to date, more than 3,200 now have been verified, and 2,325 of these were discovered by Kepler. Launched in March 2009, Kepler is the first NASA mission to find potentially habitable Earth-size planets. For four years, Kepler monitored 150,000 stars in a single patch of sky, measuring the tiny, telltale dip in the brightness of a star that can be produced by a transiting planet. In 2018, NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will use the same method to monitor 200,000 bright nearby stars and search for planets, focusing on Earth and Super-Earth-sized.

    Ames manages the Kepler missions for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, managed Kepler mission development. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation operates the flight system, with support from the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder.

    in reply to: What’s So Special About Scorpio? ;-) #3063

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    Ohhh boy, thanks, Mercury retrograde! First Facebook stole my lower case A, S, G and U this morning, and now I’ve lost the ability to post emoticons? 😥 Gah! That shock won’t even show now! What am I to do???

    It seems I can’t even upload the picture now to this post. Good grief!!!! (Leaving this edit in so you can see I haven’t lost my touch with graphics. lol It’s NOT my fault!)
    null
    [Trying one more time to see if it’s fixed. Mercury Rx is really doing a number on computing issues today!]

    Checking again to see if even the smilies are enabled again…hmmm… I think this might be an issue for the behind-the-scenes geniuses. We’ll see. :whistle: [FINALLY! lol]

    in reply to: What’s So Special About Scorpio? ;-) #3061

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    Luckily, KJMcE, not all Scorpio women. 🙂 I have a Scorpio rising, and I consider myself therefore in the Scorpio women category. I’m delighted to be your friend and nothing more. :yahoo:

    My point is thankfully not all people of a particular Sun or Moon or rising sign will ever be the same as all others in that category (said for those who don’t know: I trust you do). my point is also that there are Scorpio women–myself included–who you’ll probably find who are very comfortable with being your friend and want nothing more than that from you.

    You might consider the role your own chart plays in this mix as to what creates the setting you’ve described though.

    Just a thought… 🙂

    in reply to: Tell me the way of learing Astrology and Tarot Card! #2935

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    Hi Brenjail, and welcome to the site!

    Learn Tarot is one of the best sites I know of for learning to read the Tarot owned by Joan Bunning who has also written a book on the subject. She’s been around for at least 20 years! While there are many superb sites with highly developed conversations on the subject of Tarot, Joan Bunning will offer the foundations to get you firmly grounded in your exploration, and she offers a free online course!

    As for learning astrology, for starters, I’m certainly happy to answer questions. If you’re a member of Facebook, I can also direct you to my KISS (Keep It Simply Serious) Astrology group there which is devoted to offering a place for professional astrologers to discuss techniques with each other at the same time we’re all there to reply to students who are in various stages of learning. If you can tell me what you are seeking, Brenjail, I’ll have a better idea on how to guide you in this area since all astrology isn’t the same: there are areas of specialization and approach that can help me to know whether you’d do well to follow one particular astrologer or another (while I obviously hope you’ll stay here with me too! :yes: )


    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    And this one, Expecto?

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by  MYadmin. Reason: changed song since other one is no longer available

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    Hermes4, Collby, I just happened to notice you posted a song that has apparently been removed from YouTube. By any chance do you remember which one is was so you can repost it with a new link? Just thought I’d ask… :scratch: :unsure: :whistle:


    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    We really need that “like” button although a “love” button would be nice too, wouldn’t it, Expecto?

    And I found one to share…a love song that really has an astrological theme to it, I think. See what you think of this–if you haven’t heard it yet, that is.

    in reply to: What’s So Special About Scorpio? ;-) #2923

    Michelle Young
    Keymaster

    I’m glad I could help, Colleen! And congratulations on her journey through the Ph.D experience! The timing with this chart looks just perfect in terms of her growth!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 491 total)